Education - Path to Leadership

Why Help Children in Haiti?  Haiti is the poorest country in the western hemisphere. The impact of this spirit-crushing impoverishment is especially felt by the children whose families cannot afford the cost of education.  Since 1995, Hope for Haiti's Children has helped to establish and fund the construction of 10 Christian school facilities in partnership with local Haitian churches of Christ.  Located in the central and west regions of Haiti, these church affiliated schools serve over 2,500 children. Of the 2,500 children enrolled, over 1,487 are HFHC sponsored!

Hope for Haiti's Children serves to unite a child in need with a sponsor who provides that child with the funds necessary to receive a quality Christian education. We also manage grants to assist with vocational training for young adults, construction of new schools, and facility repairs/improvements.

Our Schools

Brajirois, pronounced Bra-jsha-wah, is located at the very top of a mountain, accessible only by 4-wheel drive vehicles. The community has no electricity and no running water. Families in Brajirois walk two hours each way for water from a polluted stream. The water must be boiled or filtered before drinking. Children in the Brajirois Christian Elementary School sit on long wooden benches facing blackboard partitions.

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Cazeau, pronounced Cä-zō, is a section of Port-au-Prince about one mile from the international airport. The Cazeau Christian Elementary School sits atop a hill adjacent to the Cazeau Christian Orphanage. The school is highly regarded for its academic excellence. One hundred percent of 6th grade students have passed their National Exam for six consecutive years. The children in this one-room school sit on wooden benches facing blackboard partitions. In 2014, volunteers from Unleash Kids helped start an after-school computer club to teach basic computer skills.

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Cite Soleil, pronounced Sĭ-tā Sō-lā, is a large seaside slum area of Port-au-Prince rife with drug trafficking, oppression, and gang warfare. Yet within this extreme poverty and despair, students find the Cite Soleil Christian Elementary School a safe haven secured behind a metal gate. In spite of the severe living conditions, the children attend school dressed in clean uniforms. The students sit on backless benches with desktops, sometimes as many as twelve per bench. 

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Delmas, pronounced Del-mah, is a large region of downtown Port-au-Prince. The Delmas Christian School is located on Delmas Street -- one of the busiest avenues in the city. Rebuilt after its complete destruction in the 2010 earthquake, this well-respected 3-story elementary and secondary school educates 580 students. The first floor was rebuilt in January 2012. The second floor, housing a majority of the school classrooms, was completed in 2013. The third floor is partially finished with open-air classrooms along the front and west side.

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Dubuisson, pronounced Doo-bē-säw, is a small village about 5 miles northwest of Mirebalais on a major paved road. The area of Dubuisson has fertile soil, with rice and other crops grown there. In 2014, this school added grades 7th-9th to better serve the children in the area.

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Hinche, pronounced Hĭnch, has a population of about 50,000 people and is located in the center of Haiti near the Dominican Republic border. The students at the one-room Hinche Christian Elementary School sit on long wooden benches facing blackboard partitions. The school is now connected to city water. The school has no electricity even though city power is available for the connection process.

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Mirebalais, pronounced Mĭrä-bä-lay, is a major community in the south-central part of Haiti on the Artibonite River. The area of Mirebalais has fertile soil, with rice and other crops grown there. The students at the Mirebalais Christian Elementary School sit on long wooden benches facing individual blackboards placed against the wall. 

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Pageste, pronounced Pä-jest, is a small village about ½ mile north of the Artibonite River from the city of Mirebalais. People travel to the village either by swimming across the river or by being ferried across in a handmade wooden boat. Families in Pageste carry water from the nearby Artibonite River. The water must be boiled or filtered before drinking since cholera and other diseases are common. The students at the Pageste Christian Elementary School sit on long wooden benches facing individual blackboards placed against the wall. 

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Robert, pronounced Rō-bear, is located at the very top of a mountain with a beautiful view of the Caribbean ocean. Accessible only by 4-wheel drive vehicles, the community has no electricity and no running water. The students at the Robert Christian Elementary School sit on long wooden benches facing blackboard partitions. The school captures rain water in a concrete cistern shich is used by the school, children, and church community.

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Thomazeau, pronounced Tom-ä-zō, is a city approximately 1½ hour drive northeast of Port-au-Prince. The area to the north of the city has a mountain range, which has lost all its forests and much of its topsoil. Farmers still try to grow crops, but many families go hungry due to lack of water and poor soil conditions. Hope for Haiti's Children's Hope Center is on 22 acres to the northwest of Thomazeau in the Debas section and includes an orphanage, mission house, a micro-farm, community water well, and a new Thomazeau Christian School with four classrooms.  

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